SMQ Issue 8:3

Contents for SMQ Issue 8:3

Book Review2, 8-3
Authors: Larry DeGaris, Ph.D.
Abstract: Sport Marketing: Managing the Exchange Process George R. Milne Mark A. McDonald Jones and Bartlett Publishers International

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Book Review 8-3
Authors: Sharianne Walker, Ph.D.
Abstract: Cases in Sport Marketing Mark A. McDonald George R. Milne Jones and Bartlett Publishers

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The Influence of New Team Entry Upon Brand Switching in the J-League
Authors: Munehiko Harada, Hirotaka Matsuoka
Abstract: The present study (a) explored how brand switching occus among professional soccer fans under the situation of a new team entry and (b) examined the relationship between brand switching and team identification. This study focused on the behavior of specta

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SMQ PROfile 8-3
Authors: SMQ Editor
Abstract: Peg Lalor Gorge Games The University of Waterloo

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Journal Update: July-August 1998
Authors: Dan Covell
Abstract: This column is designed to provide sport marketing academicians and practioners with brief descriptions of professionally relevant articles culled from a broad range of publications. Articles are arranged by subject matter, and listed alphabetically by author. Information regarding subscriptions and the acquiaition of back issues can be found at the end of the column.

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We Got Next-Next What? An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the WNBA Tag Line and a Case for Sport Marketing Research
Authors: Elizabeth L. Shoenfelt, Allison E. Maue, Eric B. Hatcher
Abstract: For its inaugural season the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) adopted the tag line We Got Next. This phrase, commonly heard on playground basketball courts around the country, would appear to be the perfect tag line for the new basketball

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Customer Communication in Selected Professional Sports (MLB, NFL, NHL, NBA): A Test
Authors: James W. Bovinet M.B.A. D.B.A.
Abstract: Recent articles in Sport Marketing Quarterly have suggested that professional sport organizations need to adapt a relationship marketing model for their operations. As a fairly complex concept, relationship marketing generally works only in businesses that have developed a keen sense of consumer communications. The reality of this situation is that many professional franchises have not mastered the basic marketing principle of communication. As an example, a letter requesting ticket information is sent to every professional football, basketball, hockey, and baseball team in the United States. The results of those requests and a discussion of the implications are included in this effort.

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Marketing Implications of Title IX for Collegiate Athletic Departments
Authors: Carol A. Barr, William A. Sutton, Erin M. McDermott
Abstract: Title IX prohibits sex discrimination in any educational program or activity that receives federal funding. Collegiate athletic departments have found themselves under the Title IX microscope and have been feeling the effects of the implementation of this law. This study was performed to determine Title IX’s impact on the athletic marketing area within an athletic department. In addition, data comparisons were made between divisions to determine if differences existed in the types of activities or criteria used surrounding the marketing and promotion of women’s sport programs. Collegiate sport marketers and athletic administrators can use this information to assist in documenting the need for additional marketing budgetary and personal support for the women’s sport programs ensuring Title IX compliance in this component area.

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Attitudes Toward Beer and Tobacco Sports Sponsorships
Authors: Fredric Kropp, Anne M. Lavack, Vassilis Dalakas
Abstract: This paper examines the differences in attitudes toward sports sponsorships between smokers and nonsmokers, and between beer drinkers and nondrinkers, in the United States, Canada, and Australia. The key findings are that beer drinkers have significantly more positive attitudes toward beer sponsorships than do those who do not drink beer, whereas smokers have significantly more positive attitudes toward tobacco sponsorships than do nonsmokers. In general, attitudes toward beer sponsorships are significantly more positive than attitudes toward tobacco sponsorships. This difference in attitudes can be explained by the greater social acceptability of drinking as compared to smoking.

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