SMQ Issue 24:4

Contents for SMQ Issue 24:4

SMQ 24:4
Authors: Masayuki Yoshida, Bob Heere, Patrick Walsh, Hansol Hwang, Choong Hoon Lim, Paul M. Pedersen, Joon Sung Lee, Joon-Ho Kang, Minkyo Lee, Choong Hoon Lim, In-Sung Yeo, Hiroaki Ninomiya, Alan Morse, and Mark A. Dodds

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Abstract: This is a special Issue on Sport Marketing in Asia of Sport Marketing Quarterly, Volume 24, No. 4, December 2015.

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Industry Insider: Sean Pyun, pp. 203-206
Authors: Alan Morse
Abstract: An interview with Sean Pyun, managing director of international business affairs of the LPGA

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Sport Marketing in Asia: Exploring Trends and Issues in the 21st Century, pp. 207-213
Authors: Masayuki Yoshida and Bob Heere
Abstract: The scarcity of academic research on sport marketing in the Asian context calls for a conceptual extension that can serve as a stimulus and foundation for future research. In this paper, we develop five research propositions for sport consumer decision-making in a cross-cultural context. Identifying important moderating variables based on the literature on cultural dimensions (individualism-collectivism and uncertainty avoidance) and ideological orientations (nationalism and globalism), we attempt to explain why and under what conditions consumer satisfaction and team identification are (1) more impacted by consumer motives, service quality, and points of attachment and (2) more effective in increasing three types of consumer outcomes: transactional consumer outcomes, non-transactional consumer outcomes, and sponsorship outcomes. Directions for future research are discussed in terms of the utility of the derived propositions in cross-country research.

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Examining the Use of Professional Sport Teams as a Brand Extension Strategy in Korean Professional Baseball, pp. 214-224
Authors: Patrick Walsh, Hansol Hwang, Choong Hoon Lim, and Paul M. Pedersen
Abstract: While the examination of brand extensions in sport has started to garner more attention, research on the use of professional sport teams as brand extensions of non-sport related corporate parent brands is limited. In particular, what has yet to be examined is the perceived impact ownership of these teams has on the parent brand. The authors sought to examine this effect by interviewing team executives of professional baseball teams in South Korea that are owned by corporate parent brands (e.g., the Samsung Lions, Kia Tigers). The results suggest that the teams are generally given power by the parent brand to operate autonomously, and there was some consensus that team performance does have an effect on parent brand image and sales of the parent brand’s products and/or services. These findings shed light on the nature of using teams as brand extensions and provide a number of theoretical and practical implications.

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Impacts of Sport Event Service Quality on Fans’ Team Identification and Revisit Intent, pp. 225-234
Authors: Joon Sung Lee and Joon-Ho Kang
Abstract: By incorporating two different types of event satisfaction (core and peripheral event), the present study aims to test whether sporting event satisfaction can increase fans’ team identification and revisit intent. Data were collected from a total of 224 spectators of a Korean men’s professional basketball event. The results indicate that performance-related satisfaction had a positive impact on both team identification and revisit intent, while peripheral-event-related satisfaction had a positive impact only on revisit intent. Moreover, team identification was found to partially mediate the impact of core event satisfaction on revisit intent. In particular, we found that satisfaction from performance-related elements increased the level of team identification, while satisfaction from event-related factors did not. Examining the mediating role of team identification in the relationship between consumer satisfaction and revisit intent, this study extends the sport marketing literature that has focused primarily on the direct impact of consumer satisfaction on revisit intent.

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The Marketing of an International Match in Asia: The Effects of Sport Commentary and Sporting Nationalism on Framing, Priming, and Consumer Behavior, pp. 235-245
Authors: Minkyo Lee, Choong Hoon Lim, In-Sung Yeo, and Paul M. Pedersen
Abstract: Media coverage associated with nationalistic sentiments in mega sporting events has received scholarly attention. The authors extend existing research on the impact of two different types of commentaries (i.e., objective and color commentary) by conducting an experiment with a 2 (commentary condition) 2 (nationalistic sentiments) factorial design. Data from college students in Korea (N = 80) were collected to examine 1) the influence of commentary and nationalistic sentiments on team image and hostility and 2) the effect of commentary on attitudes toward products through team image. Moderated Multiple Regressions (MMR) showed that nationalistic sentiments moderated the effect of the commentary on the cognitive responses. Further, the Sobel test revealed that team image fully mediated the effect of commentary on attitudes toward products made in the opposing team’s country. The results indicate that nationalistic sentiments in conjunction with media effects play an important role in international televised sports.

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Price Elasticity of Ticket Demand in the Professional Basketball League in Japan: Simulating Ticket Purchase Rates using Conjoint Analysis, pp. 246-257
Authors: Hiroaki Ninomiya
Abstract: This study uses conjoint analysis to investigate the price elasticity of ticket demand in the professional basketball league in Japan, the bj-league. Three variables—game day, opposition team, and ticket price—are explored in the research design. Primary data obtained from 368 bj-league spectators are used to explore ticket preferences by seat type (reserved seat A, reserved seat B, nonreserved seat). The sensitivity of ticket purchase rate to the fluctuations in virtual ticket prices is estimated through simulation. The simulation that operationalized ticket price shows that the ticket purchase rate for popular teams is less sensitive to fluctuations in the ticket prices for reserved seat B and nonreserved seat spectators. This study suggests that the price elasticity of ticket demand is relatively elastic for high-priced tickets and relatively inelastic for lowpriced tickets.

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Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Cases Impact Sport Marketing Strategies, pp. 258-260
Authors: Mark A. Dodds
Abstract: Sporting events are utilized by sport marketers to promote their brands to the event patrons and local consumers while providing a platform for the brand to reach a potentially global marketplace. But these types of events may also breed negative incident risks, such as bribery and corruption (United Nations Global Compact, 2014). Recent cases involving the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) shed new light on how this anti-bribery law impacts international sport sponsorships. Recently, the U.S. Department of Justice brought FCPA enforcement actions against three organizations that may impact sport marketing strategies. The first case may allow a mega-event to face bribery charges during its bidding process while the other two cases deal with corporate hospitality associated with sporting mega-events.

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