SMQ Issue 23:3

Contents for SMQ Issue 23:3

SMQ 23.3
Authors: Alexandris Kostas, Kaplanidou Kyriaki, Sung Keun (SK) Koo, Kevin K. Byon, Thomas A. Baker, Xiaoyan Xing, Laurence Chalip, B. Christine Green, Girish Prayag, Elsa Grivel, Jeeyoon Kim, Joon Ho Kang, Yu-Kyoum Kim, Steve McKelvey, and John Grady
Abstract: Sport Marketing Quarterly, Volume 23, No. 3, September 2014.

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View from the Field: Heidi Pellerano, p. 123-124
Authors: Heidi Pellerano
Abstract: The demographic composition of the United States has vastly changed over the past 20 years. It is projected that by 2050, today’s minority population will become the new majority. A big catalyst of that change has been the dramatic growth of the Hispanic population. If you study this consumer group just by the numbers, you will learn that if U.S. Hispanics were a standalone country, they would rank as the 12th largest economy in the world. If you are a brand that is targeting women, you will soon learn that 1 in 4 new mothers in the US is Hispanic. If you are specifically reaching out to new moms in California and Texas that number is closer to 1 in 2. What if you are a brand targeting the youth segment? You will uncover that 40% of Hispanics are under the age of 21. All of these numbers are a marketer’s dream.

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Guest Editors’ Introduction: Marketing Sport Event Tourism: Sport Tourist Behaviors and Destination Provisions, pp. 125-126
Authors: Alexandris Kostas and Kaplanidou Kyriaki
Abstract: Sport tourism is one of the fastest growing forms of special tourism internationally; it is well documented today that it can contribute towards the economic and tourism development of local communities, cities, regions, and countries (Hinch & Higham, 2011). In the US, for example, the sport event sector is a prominent one and among the fastest-developing markets within sport tourism. There was a 10.5% event growth from 2010 through 2012 (Schumacher, 2012). This rise in the number of sport events that countries, regions, and communities host denotes the importance of sport events and sport tourist behaviors for tourism and economic development.

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Integrating Event Image, Satisfaction, and Behavioral Intention: Small-Scale Marathon Event, pp. 127-137
Authors: Sung Keun (SK) Koo, Kevin K. Byon, and Thomas A. Baker
Abstract: While mega events substantially contribute to a hosting community’s economy and marketing appeal, small-scale events might result in more positive effects because they operate within an existing infrastructure, require a smaller budget, create a more manageable level of crowd congestion, and have high-impact regional effects on the community. Despite the positive effects and prevalence of small-scale events, few have examined their conceptual development. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hierarchical relationship among event image, satisfaction, and behavioral intention (i.e., intention to revisit and recommend the event to others) in the context of a small-scale marathon event. A total of 297 valid questionnaires were collected from participants at the Mercedes-Benz Marathon Event and the Publix Marathon Event, recurring small-scale marathon events held in southeastern cities in the United States. Results from a confirmatory factor analysis of the event image-satisfaction-behavioral intentions model indicated a good fit to the data. The results of regression analyses demonstrated that event image and satisfaction were positively associated with behavioral intention and that satisfaction partially mediated the relationship between event image and behavioral intention. In addition, the z-value provided by the Sobel test indicated that the indirect effect of event image on behavioral intention through satisfaction was significant. The findings offer important implications for event organizers (i.e., marathon) that can be used to develop marketing strategies that attract participants to small-scale marathon events.

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Marketing a Social Experience: How Celebration of Subculture Leads to Social Spending During a Sport Event, pp. 138-147
Authors: Xiaoyan Xing, Laurence Chalip, and B. Christine Green
Abstract: The social experience that attendees obtain at a sport event has been shown to play a vital role in their overall evaluation of an event and the likelihood that they will return in the future. The purpose of this study is to identify factors that determine the amount of spending to support social experiences at an event. Spending to support social experience includes nonessential spending to eat in restaurants, drink alcoholic beverages, shop, and take tours. These categories of spending (as a percent of total spendig) at an event are expected to derive from attendees’ identification with the sport’s subculture, their level of social motivation, and the sense of community that is fostered at the event. These expectations are tested using SEM on data collected from 218 adult women at a national women’s football tournament. Results revealed that identification with the women’s football subculture significantly predicted social motivation; social motivation significantly predicted sense of community; and sense of community significantly predicted social spending. Findings suggest that event management fostering a sense of community among attendees will enhance social spending, and that appeals to social motivation and subcultural identity are useful tools to promote a sense of community among attendees.

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Motivation, Satisfaction, and Behavioral Intentions: Segmenting Youth Participants at the Interamnia World Cup 2012, pp. 148-160
Authors: Girish Prayag and Elsa Grivel
Abstract: The present study is aimed at segmenting participants’ motivation for attending the Interamnia World Cup (IWC) in 2012 and identifying whether motivational profiles differ by demographics and post-consumption behaviors. The IWC is an annual event hosted by the city of Teramo-Italy and is aimed at young participants interested in the sport of handball. Based on a sample of international sport tourists (n = 242), the study uncovers four clusters of participants (Indifferent, Enthusiast, Socializer, and Competitive). The results confirm that the youth segment of sport tourists is not homogeneous on motives to attend a sporting event. The four identified segments differ by socio-demographics, overall satisfaction, revisit, and recommend intentions. Implications for attracting participants to IWC and marketing of youth sporting events in general are suggested.

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Impact of Mega Sport Events on Destination Image and Country Image, pp. 161-175
Authors: Jeeyoon Kim, Joon Ho Kang, and Yu-Kyoum Kim
Abstract: Mega sport events are believed to positively and significantly impact the host country’s destination image (from the tourism perspective) and country image (from the international marketing perspective). Focusing on the short-haul market, this study questioned the prevailing “optimism” and empirically examined the impact of hosting a mega sport event on the destination image and country image through a pre-post study design. The results presented a mixed (i.e., both positive and negative) impact on the two images, and patterns of image change varied according to sport involvement, media consumption, and previous visit experiences to the host country. Additionally, this study investigated the influence of destination and country images on visit and purchase intentions. We found strong relationships among constructs and destination image was the key construct in the relation. The findings suggest the need and possibilities for inter-disciplinary research and integrated management strategies for improving destination and country images.

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On Second Thought … Recent Decisions Continue to Reshape Intellectual Property Landscape, pp. 176-179
Authors: Steve McKelvey and John Grady
Abstract: “Sport Marketing and the Law” column of Sport Marketing Quarterly—have, through the appellate process, produced new decisions warranting attention from legal and sport marketing scholars and practitioners. These recent decisions have the potential to reshape certain aspects of sport marketing practice and reflect litigation trends of which savvy sport marketers should be aware.

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