SMQ Issue 22:2

Contents for SMQ Issue 22:2

A Note from the SMA Vice President of Industry Relations, p. 67
Authors: Steve McKelvey
Abstract: One of the ideas that emerged from our mid-year SMA Board Meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico, was that the board members share their thoughts in lieu of the traditional “Letter from the President.” Hence, I am pleased to provide some updates and perspective in my role as Vice President of Industry Relations.

>> Subscribe Now

2013 June issue
Authors: Steve McKelvey, Jan Katzoff, Angeline G. Close, Russell Lacey, Chen-Yueh Chen, Yi-Hsiu Lin, Wen-Mei Chang, Michael Cottingham, Brian Gearity, Kevin K. Byon, Greg Greenhalgh, T. Christopher Greenwell, Thomas A. Baker III, Natasha T. Brison, Kevin K. Byon
Abstract: This is the entire issue in PDF format that you can download.

>> Subscribe Now

View from the Field: Jan Katzoff, pp. 69-70
Authors: Jan Katzoff
Abstract: When the eyes of the sports world turn their attention to Sochi, Russia, in February 2014, they will see one of the most unique developments in the history of winter sports. This Black Sea resort will host an Olympic games unlike any other. It will be the first time that a winter resort has literally been developed from scratch to host one of the world’s premier sporting events. The area has currently been acknowledged as the world’s largest construction project, with Olympic-related expenditures reported to be around $18 billion (USD) and over $55 billion (USD) invested in total development and infrastructure. Because of the location and logistics involved, the Sochi Olympics are forcing the Olympic family to be more strategic than ever in planning on behalf of corporate partners and the Olympic Games themselves.

>> Subscribe Now

Fit Matters? Asymmetrical Impact for Effectiveness on Sponsors and Event Marketers, p. 71-82
Authors: Angeline G. Close and Russell Lacey
Abstract: This sport marketing study establishes a clearer demarcation between an event sponsor and a sponsored event in relation to investigating the potential value of congruity. Based on 1,615 field surveys, we uncover the asymmetrical impact of event-sponsor fit on the title sponsor and sponsored professional cycling event. Specifically, the study reveals how consumers’ positive perceptions of the sponsor rise when they perceive greater fit with the event; yet, congruity does not influence consumers’ attitudes toward the event. That is, even when the event and sponsor are perceived as a mismatch, it does not impact how the attendee assesses the event. Event-sponsor fit makes for a stronger sponsorship investment, especially when the sponsor is seen as socially responsible. The tested model illustrates how the transfer of corporate social responsibility serves to bridge favorable attitudes toward the event with positive sponsor brand associations and purchasing intent for the sponsor’s brands.

>> Subscribe Now

Impulsive Purchasing Behavior for Professional Sports Team-Licensed Merchandise—From the Perspective of Group Effects, pp. 83-91
Authors: Chen-Yueh Chen, Yi-Hsiu Lin, and Wen-Mei Chang
Abstract: The present research was conducted to explore the impact of social influence (type of reference, group cohesiveness, and susceptibility to influence) on impulsive purchasing behavior of sports team-licensed merchandise. Two experimental studies were conducted. It was concluded from the results that peers’ presence stimulated higher impulsive purchasing behavior of sports team-licensed merchandise than family members’ presence. In addition, high group cohesiveness activated a greater impulsive purchasing tendency of sports team-licensed merchandise compared to low group cohesiveness. High susceptibility as opposed to low susceptibility to influence resulted in greater impulsive purchasing tendency of sports team-licensed merchandise. Moreover, the presence of high-cohesive peers stimulated a greater impulsive purchasing tendency than the presence of low-cohesive peers. High susceptibility to influence demonstrated a greater impulsive purchasing tendency of sports team-licensed merchandise than low susceptibility within the presence of peers.

>> Subscribe Now

A Qualitative Examination of Disability Sport Executives’ Perceptions of Sport Promotion and the Acquisition of Sponsors, pp. 92-100
Authors: Michael Cottingham, Brian Gearity, and Kevin K. Byon
Abstract: While research exists on the marketing of disability sport (Byon, Carroll, Cottingham, Grady, & Allen, 2011), researchers have not yet examined disability sport executives’ perspectives on marketing, promotion, and sponsorship. The purpose of this study was to examine three disability sport (i.e., International Wheelchair Rugby Federation, International Tennis Federation, and United States Tennis Association) executives’ perspectives of sport marketability and the acquisition of sponsors. Key findings include executives’ mixed-support for webcasting, television coverage, and the need to develop strategic partnerships and effective implementation of traditional sponsorship (e.g., corporate social responsibility and specific product sponsorship). Notwithstanding some reservations, executives also stated that presenting athletes with disabilities as inspirational would likely benefit visibility and market share.

>> Subscribe Now

What’s in It for Me? An Investigation of North American Professional Niche Sport Sponsorship Objectives, pp. 101-112
Authors: Greg Greenhalgh and T. Christopher Greenwell
Abstract: Sponsorship funding often represents a significant portion of a niche sport property’s operating capital. Considering professional niche sport properties often solicit the same corporations as mainstream professional sport properties, intercollegiate athletic departments, even arts or music festivals, professional niche sports must understand how their properties can effectively help potential partners achieve their corporate objectives. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to identify the objectives sponsors deem important when evaluating professional niche sport sponsorship opportunities within North America. To address this purpose, responses from 32 organizations that had sponsored niche sports were analyzed to identify which objectives they found most important. Findings from the current study indicated that niche sport sponsors placed a relatively high level of importance on increasing their corporate awareness, specifically within a particular target market. Niche sport sponsors also look to enhance their company’s image, and enhance community involvement through their sponsorship.

>> Subscribe Now

Like It or Not … Coastal Contacts Case Sets Guidelines for ‘Like-Gating’ on Facebook, pp. 113-116
Authors: Thomas A. Baker III, Natasha T. Brison, and Kevin K. Byon
Abstract: Social media provides brands with “personal, trusted, and direct” connectivity to consumers (Drury, 2008, p. 277). Through social media, brands are able to target specific consumer demographics about new and existing products, thereby increasing the likelihood of purchase of those products. With more than 1 billion active users (“Facebook Newsroom,” 2012), Facebook has become a leader in social media and an important vehicle through which sport marketers connect their brands with consumers. From the London 2012 Olympics alone, brands saw significant growth in fan interaction on Facebook. For example, Coca-Cola experienced a 126% increase in Facebook users, and Visa grew 67% (O’Malley, 2012). One popular method for marketing through Facebook is a process called like-gating. Like-gating encourages consumers to like a company or brand on Facebook, often in exchange for something of value (i.e., a coupon for a free sample) (Aronica, 2011). The result is a vast increase in the number of consumers who have chosen to associate themselves with a brand through Facebook. A recent decision from the Council of Better Business Bureau’s (CBBB) National Advertising Division (NAD) in Coastal Contacts, Inc. (2011) (Coastal) determined that Facebook likes are general social endorsements of companies or brands, and like-gating practices may be deceptive in instances where consumers rely on Facebook likes to make purchase decisions.

>> Subscribe Now