SMQ Issue 18:4

Contents for SMQ Issue 18:4

Editor’s Note, pp. 183
Authors: Matthew Shank
Abstract: It is with mixed emotions that I write my last editorial note for Sport Marketing Quarterly (SMQ). The three years of service to SMQ and its stakeholders have been hard work, but also afforded me the opportunity to work with some very talented people.

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SMQ Profile/Interview: Mike Sweeney, Director of Cleveland WhiteCaps Premier Soccer, pp. 184-187
Authors: Matthew Robinson
Abstract: An interview with Mike Sweeney, director of Cleveland WhiteCaps Premier Soccer.

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Signage vs. No Signage: An Analysis of Sponsorship Recognition in Women’s College Basketball, pp. 188-198
Authors: Heather Maxwell and Nancy Lough
Abstract: The reliance on signage to generate spectator recognition of sponsors has become so commonplace that the concept of sponsorship is nearly synonymous with the use of signage in sport venues. A multitude of studies have measured sponsorship recognition and/or recall among sport spectators as the means to justify the practice (Bennett, Henson, & Zhang, 2002; Cuneen & Hannan, 1993; Nicholls, Roslow, & Dublish, 1999; Pitts & Slattery, 2004; Pitts, 1998; Stotlar, 1993; Stotlar & Johnson, 1989). Previous literature suggests more highly involved spectators, such as college sport fans, are typically more likely to recognize and support sport sponsors (Dodd, 1997; Pitts, 1998, 2003; Pope & Voges, 2000; Quester, 1997; Shannon & Turley, 1997; Turco, 1995). However, no studies to date have examined correct sponsorship recognition when signage was not utilized. For some, the absence of signage suggests an absence of sponsorship. Yet, in a handful of college basketball arenas, signage is not allowed. As concern grows regarding the commercialization of college sport (Knight Commission, 2009) the possibility of eliminating signage has emerged as a salient construct worthy of further examination. Similarly, few studies have focused specifically on the effectiveness of sponsorship for women’s sport (Lough, 1996; Lough & Irwin, 2001). As such, the primary purpose of this study was to examine how the presence of sponsor signage in collegiate basketball arenas influences correct sponsorship recognition by women’s basketball spectators. A secondary purpose for the study was to identify additional variables significantly contributing to correct sponsor recognition by women’s basketball spectators.

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The Relationship Between Spectator Motivations and Media and Merchandise Consumption at a Professional Mixed Martial Arts Event, pp. 199-209
Authors: Damon P. S. Andrew, Seungmo Kim, Nick O’Neal, T. Christopher Greenwell, and Jeffrey D. James
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore how nine motives impact media and merchandise consumption among consumers of Mixed Martial Arts (MMA). The present study extends previous research by examining the relationship between motivations and merchandise and media consumption among consumers at a large, professional MMA event. A one-way MANOVA was computed to test for gender differences in relation to attendance motivations in the present sample. After significant differences among spectator motives were identified, two separate backward deletion linear regression analyses revealed significant relationships between spectator motivations and media and merchandise consumption for males and females. The findings suggest the implementation of varying marketing strategies for males and females in order to impact media and merchandise consumption of MMA spectators.

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Spectator Motives: Why Do We Watch When Our Favorite Team Is Not Playing?, pp. 210-217
Authors: Janet S. Fink and Heidi M. Parker
Abstract: A plethora of research has examined sport spectator motives (James & Ridinger, 2002; Robinson & Trail, 2005) yet much of this research has focused on spectators watching their favorite team. Thus, this research sought to expand the current motives literature by comparing spectators’ motives for watching their favorite team versus watching games in which their favorite team is not involved. Participants’ motives were assessed using Trail and James’s (2001) Motivation Scale for Sport Consumption (MSSC). Results revealed the motives of drama, skill, and social were rated the highest in both game types. Additionally, both men and women rated those same motives the highest. However, there were significant differences by game type and gender relative to some motives. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

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The Jordan’s Furniture “Monster Deal”: A Legal Gamble?, pp. 218-221
Authors: Eli C. Bortman
Abstract: In the spring of 2007, Jordan’s, a Boston area furniture retailer, attracted the attention of New England fans, media, and sport marketers with an innovative promotion entitled “Jordan’s Monster Deal.” In television commercials, the energetic president of Jordan’s Furniture enthusiastically announced: “EVERY Sofa, EVERY Sectional, EVERY Dining Table, EVERY Bed, EVERY Mattress … can be YOURS FREE if the Red Sox win the World Championship in 2007.” As an official sponsor of the Boston Red Sox, Jordan’s held the rights to designate itself the “Official Furniture Store” of the Boston Red Sox. The promotion title played off the Red Sox’s famed left field wall, referred to as the “Green Monster.”

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Savannah Sand Gnats: Macro Strategies for Using Identity to Increase Attendance in Minor League Baseball, pp. 222-227
Authors: Tony Lachowetz, Windy Dees, Sam Todd,
Abstract: It is less than a month to opening day as Bradley Dodson, General Manager, walks through Historic Grayson Stadium with John Simmons, the owner of the Savannah Sand Gnats. They survey the renovation of the stadium, comment on all the work that has been done, and contemplate what the future holds for the Sand Gnats. Dodson has been preparing for a staff meeting to discuss where the Sand Gnats stand and how to improve the organization. As he takes a seat in the stands and peers out to left field where the bleachers have been removed and the wall still needs to be finished, he considers “What can we do to improve our marketing tactics to draw more attendance over the next two to five years?” This will be the overarching question presented to the staff in the meeting today.

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