SMQ Issue 13:3

Contents for SMQ Issue 13:3

Beyond BIRGing and CORFing: Continuing the Exploration of Fan Behavior
Authors: Richard M. Campbell, Damon Aiken, Aubrey Kent
Abstract: While much previous research has been conducted related to the tendencies for sports fans to bask in reflected glory (BIRG) and cut off reflected failure (CORF), the present work derives a model of fan behavior inclusive of two new concepts that extend existing theory: basking in spite of reflected failure (BIRF) and cutting off reflected success (CORS). The authors provide examples of image-management behaviors associated with BIRF and CORS and suggest multiple explanations for these relatively unusual consumer actions. Further, the authors develop formal propositions to guide future study. The authors conclude with a brief discussion of strategic sport marketing applications as well as a theoretical expansion into additional areas of fanship.

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Address to the Sport Marketing Association
Authors: Bill Carter
Abstract: Bill Carter, president of Fuse Sports Marketing, delivered the conference president’s address at the first annual Sport Marketing Association conference in 2003.

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Sport Marketing Quarterly, Sep. 2004
Authors:
Abstract:

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SMQ13_3WholeIssue
Authors: all authors in each articles
Abstract: SMQ13-3 whole issue can be viewed here.

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Current Issues and Conceptualizations of Service Quality in the Recreation Sport Industry
Authors: Yong Jae Ko, Donna L. Pastore
Abstract: This study discusses current issues of service quality and proposes a conceptual model that is focused on consumers’ perceptions of service quality toward organizations and services in the participant sport industry. The proposed model is based on the current conceptualization of service quality, which suggests that service quality is a multidimensional and hierarchical construct. In the proposed model, service quality consists of four primary dimensions which are defined by several corresponding subdimensions: (a) program quality – range of program, operating time, and information, (b) interaction quality – client employee interaction and inter-client interaction, (c) outcome quality – physical change, valence, and sociability, and (d) environment quality – ambient condition, design, and equipment. The hierarchical approach in the model allows researchers to integrate specific procedures and/or attributes of service delivery into primary dimensions of service quality. This study is designed to resolve the conceptual differences in service quality research and provide a comprehensive conceptual framework for sport management scholars and practitioners.

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Sport Marketing and Law: Kentucky Derby Jockeys Enter Lucrative World of Sport Sponsorship and Endorsements
Authors: Anita M. Moorman
Abstract: After being fined for wearing sponsor logos on their uniform in 2003, jockeys in the 2004 Kentucky Derby were allowed to wear such patches thanks to a court ruling.

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Sport Heroes as Sport Product Endorsers: The Role of Gender in the Transfer of Meaning Process for Selected Undergraduate Students
Authors: Ted B. Peetz, Janet B. Parks, Nancy E. Spencer
Abstract: This study explored the role of gender in the transfer of meaning from athlete endorser, to product, to purchase intentions for 150 sport management and kinesiology undergraduates. Most were 18-22-year-old (96%), European-American/White (91.3%), males (68%). Participants viewed photographs of Lance Armstrong, Mia Hamm, Michael Jordan, and Jackie Joyner-Kersee and were asked to identify and describe each athlete. Participants then indicated whether they considered each athlete an expert on products related to her/his sport and whether the athlete’s endorsement would influence their purchase intentions. Repeated measures logistic regression analyses (= .05) revealed that male endorsers were more likely to be identified correctly and to influence participants’ purchase intentions. Male participants were more likely to correctly identify all endorsers. Gender differences also existed in participants’ perceptions of endorsers’ expertise and influence on purchase intentions. These findings, buttressed by meaningful measures of effect, suggest that gender plays an important role in the transfer of meaning for these members of the Generation Y market segment.

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Scoreboards vs.Mortarboards:Major Donor Behavior and Intercollegiate Athletics
Authors: Jeffrey L. Stinson, Dennis R. Howard
Abstract: In an era where intercollegiate athletics departments are increasingly reliant on and successful in obtaining charitable donations, three fundamental questions surrounding charitable contributions to educational institutions were empirically examined. Who gives to educational institutions in support of academic and athletics programs? Does the improved performance of athletic teams influence both types of giving to educational institutions? Does increased giving to athletics have a negative impact on charitable giving to educational programs at the same institution? An in-depth analysis of donor behavior at a major public university revealed that contrary to popular assumption, both alumni and non-alumni made gifts to both athletic and academic programs, though the two groups differed significantly in their behavior. Evidence indicated a winning athletics program may have significantly impacted alumni giving behavior, and that increased giving to athletics by both alumni and non-alumni was linked to a decline in academic fundraising at the same institution.

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