SMQ Issue 12:4

Contents for SMQ Issue 12:4

Sport Consumer Behavior: Assessment and Direction
Authors: Daniel C. Funk, Daniel F. Mahony, Mark E. Havitz
Abstract: Within the general field of consumer behavior, a subset of research has emerged in recent years to examine consumer behavior relative to the unique products and services offered in the sport industry. Wells’s (1993) discovery- oriented approach is utilized to critique prior sport consumer behavior research and discuss possible directions for scholars in the field. This critique illustrates that research and writing could benefit by a) exploring multiple aspects of the consumer decision- making process, b) greater attention to methodological issues, c) utilization of neighboring concepts, data, and problem solving strategies, d) development of holistic lines of research, and e) conducting research that generates questions, not just words to publish and investigating for the sake of investigating. We hope this broad critique, along with the other articles in the special issue, contribute to this growing subdiscipline and provide some frameworks for our ongoing effort to discover and understand.

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Direct and Interaction Effects of Team Identification and Satisfaction on Intention to Attend Games
Authors: Hirotaka Matsuoka, Packianathan Chelladurai, Munehiko Harada
Abstract: This study assessed the direct and interaction effects of team identification and satisfaction with facets of a game on intentions to attend future games. A sample of 1,256 spectators in seven J-League (Japan professional football/soccer league) soccer games responded to a questionnaire eliciting their team identification; satisfaction with the final score, with the performance of the favorite team, and the excellence of the contest; and intention to attend future games. Correlational and regression analyses showed that both team identification and facets of satisfaction were significantly correlated with intention to attend future games with team identification correlating at a higher level. Identification explained the greatest amount of variance in the intention to attend future games followed by satisfaction with the performance of the favorite team and excellence of the contest. The significance of the interaction of identification and satisfaction indicated that the intentions of highly identified fans relative to low-identified fans were less influenced by any of the facets of satisfaction.

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Sport Consumer Typologies: A Critical Review
Authors: Bob Stewart, Matthew Nicholson, Aaron C. T. Smith
Abstract:

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Motives and Points of Attachment: Fans Versus Spectators in Intercollegiate Athletics
Authors: Galen T. Trail, Matthew J. Robinson, Ronald J. Dick, Andrew J. Gillentine
Abstract: Marketers have long acknowledged the importance of motives to game and event attendance. In addition, it is apparent that individuals attend for different reasons and identify with different aspects of the experience. Thus, we examined the relationships among motives and points of attachment in attendees at four college football games. We proposed three different models depicting these relationships to assist in segmenting fans from spectators. Results indicated that the best-fitting model showed three types of motives that are differentially associated with two general types of attachment (organizational identification and sport identification). This indicates two segments of attendees may exist, based on motives and points of attachment. Marketers need to determine if these segments exist in their attendees and plan marketing strategies accordingly.

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Understanding Women’s Professional Basketball Game Spectators: Sociodemographics, Game Consumption, and Entertainment Options
Authors: James J. Zhang, Lori Pennington-Gray, Daniel P. Connaughton, Jessica R. Braunstein
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the hierarchical relationships among sociodemographics, lifestyle, and level of game consumption of women’s professional basketball spectators. Spectators (N = 2,048) from five regular season home games of a major WNBA team responded to a ies, Amateur Sports, and Recreational Sports). Regression analyses and analyses of variance revealed that nearly all sociodemographic variables and two lifestyle factors (Professional Sports and Amateur Sports) were related to Game Consumption; however, hierarchical regression analyses revealed that the lifestyle factors did not mediate the relationships between sociodemographics and Game Consumption. The findings demonstrate the importance of promoting women’s professional basketball games through sociodemographics, and during professional and amateur sporting events.

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