SER Issue 4:2

Contents for SER Issue 4:2

SER 4.2
Authors: Stephen Shapiro and Joris Drayer, Matthew T. Bowers and Tolga Ozyurtcu, Nefertiti Walker, Vladimir Ageev, Sergey Altukhov, Hongxin Li and John Nauright
Abstract: Sport & Entertainment Review, Volume 4, No. 2, June 2018.

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Paying the Price: Examining Consumer Response to Pricing Strategy
Authors: Stephen Shapiro and Joris Drayer
Abstract: In early 2018, excitement was high as the NFL’s Philadelphia Eagles defeated the Atlanta Falcons to advance to the NFC Championship game. The Eagles would be hosting the game for the first time since 2004, further magnifying interest in attending this game. Fans preparing to purchase tickets online from the Eagles at 10 a.m. sharp (six days before the game) were quickly reminded about the reality of ticket sales for high-demand sporting events; they were too late. Tickets on the primary market sold out in 60 seconds, leaving fans no choice but to purchase tickets on the secondary market for premium prices, more than double the face value.

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Reducing Bias to Shift Demand: A Model for Reforming Youth Sports in America
Authors: Matthew T. Bowers and Tolga Ozyurtcu
Abstract: As researchers and consultants working in youth sports, we traffic in good intentions; from parents to coaches to club and league administrators, everyone wants “what’s best for the kids.” At the same time, we are also inundated with critiques of the youth sports status quo; the same parents, coaches, and administrators rail that the current state of affairs is not “what’s best for the kids.” Despite the hint of contradiction, all of these stakeholders seem genuine in their beliefs and correct in their diagnoses: no one is working to actively undermine the youth sports experience, yet somehow it remains flawed. From this general consensus, attempts to improve youth sports have historically framed matters from a supply-side perspective. In that sense, policy-makers and coaches have doubled-down on good intentions, focusing on designing better offerings and opportunities. Yet these “build a better mousetrap” approaches have failed to adequately reform the system, and the valid critiques of youth sport remain

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The Labyrinth of Exclusion in Sport and Steps Toward Developing a Culture of Inclusion
Authors: Nefertiti Walker
Abstract: I was indoctrinated in all things basketball from the age of three. As soon as I was able to walk, my dad would bring me to his pickup basketball games. I sat on the sidelines watch­ing in amazement, playing with a basketball and anxiously awaiting my turn, which would come just a few years later. I grew up playing basketball, coaching basketball, and training basketball players. Not just women’s basketball players, but men’s basketball players too. I coached men’s basketball play­ers, I played with men in basketball games, and even joined men’s basketball leagues as a young adult. Very early on, I realized that men’s basketball seemed to be valued more by most sport fans. There are significantly more men’s basketball games broadcast on television. Men’s basketball players get paid much higher salaries than women’s basketball players. Even in college basketball, where men’s and women’s basket­ball coaches have almost identical job duties, men’s basket­ball coaches earn significantly more. I understand the basic concept of commercialization, as well as supply and demand. However, the reason for women getting paid less seems to be much more complex than simple economics, and warrants further examination. Bias, sexism, and a host of other gen­der inequity issues collide in a space I like to refer to as the labyrinth of exclusion. Even in occupations where women have a stronghold, like marketing, women leading a sport marketing department in professional men’s sport leagues is rare.

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Ice Hockey in the Metropolis: A Supply and Demand Analysis for Ice Infrastructure Use and Planning in Moscow, Russia
Authors: Vladimir Ageev, Sergey Altukhov, Hongxin Li and John Nauright
Abstract: Modern ice hockey originated in Canada, where rivers and lakes are covered with ice during the winter and people entertained themselves by inventing various compe­titions and games on ice. Gradually, this “fun on ice” gained popularity in countries with a cool climate, which helped to popularize ice hockey around the world, especially in north­ern Europe, North America, and later in northern Asia. Eventually, this led to the establishment of hockey leagues— which contributed to the commercialization of hockey, the creation of its own rules of play, and common technical stan­dards for infrastructure.

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