SER Issue 2:1

Contents for SER Issue 2:1

SER 2.1
Authors: Bill Gerrard, Timothy B. Kellison, Brian P. McCullough, Brianna Newland, and Armen Shaomian
Abstract: Sport & Entertainment Review, Volume 2, No. 1, February 2016.

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Beyond Moneyball: Using Data Analytics to Improve Performance in Elite Team Sports, pp. 3-10
Authors: Bill Gerrard
Abstract: Farhan Zaidi is a Massachusetts Institution of Technology (MIT) and University of California-Berkeley graduate who started in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a data analyst with the Oakland Athletics before being promoted to Director of Baseball Operations and then Assistant General Manager. His success with the A’s led to Zaidi being appointed General Manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers in November 2014. He is no exception, as more and more teams are hiring data analysts (or data scientists) to work alongside their video performance analysts and these data analysts are now beginning to occupy senior positions in sports organizations. Sports analytics is creating a real buzz in elite team sports these days. Industry conferences on the subject are becoming a regular event. Further, books, journals, websites, and university courses on sports analytics are now common.

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A Forecast for the Mainstreaming of Environmental Sustainability, pp. 11-18
Authors: Timothy B. Kellison and Brian P. McCullough
Abstract: By their very nature, public assembly facilities (PAFs) and the events hosted within them attract large numbers of visitors, who are often treated to state-of-the-art performances and exhibits while being offered an exceptional array of amenities. Of course, these offerings can come with considerable costs, including those borne by the host and, central to this review, the environment. Increasingly, industry leaders are exploring strategies aimed at reducing the environmental impacts of their facilities, events, and services—strategies that can often result in reductions of both types of cost. In the past two decades, many organizations have incorporated pro-environmental initiatives into their corporate identity and practices, yet the sport and entertainment industry as a whole has been slower to adopt and implement large-scale sustainability mandates (e.g., Kellison & Hong, 2015). Furthermore, a 2013 report by MIT Sloan Management Review found that only 3% of media and entertainment companies “fully engage” with environmental issues (Kiron, Kruschwitz, Rubel, Reeves, & Fuisz-Kehrbach, 2013).

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Events and Facilities as Facilitators to Lifelong Sport Involvement, pp. 19-24
Authors: Brianna Newland
Abstract: There are a number of positive assumptions held about sport and its ability to contribute to adults’ lives. Sport, when intentionally programmed, is considered a valuable vehicle to accomplish a number of social, physical, and psychological outcomes (Coakley, 2011; Dionigi, 2005). With the right focused programming and/or planning, sport also has the potential to provide important economic and social impacts to the community (Butler & Aicher, 2015). With the tremendous growth of the sport travel industry, adults are seeking sport experiences that allow them to remain active and competitive sport participants (Newland & Aicher, 2015a, 2015b). Many cities and countries are recognizing the interest and benefit to the community, both economically and socially, with the development of policy and/or initiatives aimed at building active (or participant-focused) sport tourism (Gibson, 2003). Many cities and some states created sport commissions whose primary focus is to attract and/ or bid on sport events in order to drive tourism. However, despite the growth of sport tourism related to sport participation, the access and opportunities for adult participants continue to remain inconsistent. While some sport organizations, facilities, event promoters, and parks and recreation departments recognized the critical role adult sport plays in their daily business practices, many do not realize the impact adult sport can have to their bottom line.

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The Business of Popular Music Publishing: An Interview with Troy Tomlinson, CEO of Sony/ATV Nashville, pp. 25-28
Authors: Armen Shaomian
Abstract: Troy Tomlinson is the President and CEO of Sony/ATV Music Publishing in Nashville, a division of Sony/ATV. He has been in the music publishing industry for more than three decades, and has been with Sony/ATV since 2002. He was named to his current position in 2005 and has been guiding the company through the evolution of the music industry with the rise of digital music consumption and a dramatic drop in physical record sales. Being based in Nashville, Tennessee, Tomlinson oversees the operations of all country music for the world’s largest music publisher. He has won numerous industry awards during his tenure at Sony/ATV, including being named the Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) Publisher of the Year as well as Billboard’s Country Music Publisher of the Year—10 times in a row. He is also responsible for having signed acts such as Kenny Chesney, Taylor Swift, Blake Shelton, Miranda Lambert, Rascal Flatts, and others. At his role at the publishing giant, Tomlinson is also in charge of supervising and overseeing the catalogs and publishing rights of legends such as Willie Nelson, Hank Williams, and the Everly Brothers, plus millions of other works. I sat down with him in Nashville to ask him about his view on the changing industry of music publishing.

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