SER Issue 1:1

Contents for SER Issue 1:1

SER 1.1
Authors: Bob Heere, Chad Seifried, David J. Berri, Daniel A. Rascher, Michael M. Goldman, Mary A. Hums, and Eli A. Wolff
Abstract: Sport & Entertainment Review, Volume 1, No. 1, February 2015.

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Editors’ Note, pp. 3-6
Authors: Bob Heere and Chad Seifried
Abstract: Welcome to the inaugural issue of Sport and Entertainment Review (formerly the Journal of Venue and Event Management). This is the first issue we organized as the new editor and associate editor, so we thought that in addition to highlighting the articles and authors we recruited to join the journal this year, we could also share with the readers our vision for the journal. This journal is built around the following pillars.

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Think You Know Basketball? You Need to Know the Numbers to Know the Game, pp. 7-14
Authors: David J. Berri
Abstract: Critical to the success of any (sport) entertainment organization is its ability to evaluate talent and recruit the best performers. Entertainment is a star-driven industry and the success of a team, event, or entertainment product (such as a movie, theater show, or concert) is often dependent on the ability of the organization to select the right performer for their entertainment property (Elberse, 2013). Among all forms of entertainment, sport might have it the easiest in recruiting and evaluating talent, as unlike other forms of entertainment, the performance of athletes is grounded in quantifiable actions. Nevertheless, as we demonstrated in The Wages of Wins (2006), many sport organizations struggle with the task of selecting talent.

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Tracking the Dollars: How Economic Impact Studies Can Actually Benefit Managerial Decision Making, pp. 15-19
Authors: Daniel A. Rascher and Michael M. Goldman
Abstract: Almost every month brings another attention-grabbing headline about a city or country considering a bid for a major sporting or entertainment event. Politicians, business executives, and excited fans weigh in about the possible costs and benefits, with limited numbers provided about the possible economic impact, and even less said about how these numbers were calculated. Most recently, LeBron James’ return to Cleveland was estimated by Bloomberg to boost the city’s economy by $215 million annually, while Cuyahoga County’s projections were more than double this number. A concert of Jay-Z and Beyonce in Baltimore in 2013 was estimated by the local newspapers to have an economic impact of between $20 million and $40 million. In these cases (as with so many others), these numbers were highly debated and many of our management colleagues were quick to dismiss the estimated size of the impact. Yet, as we get distracted by the discussion of how high the impact of a particular sport or entertainment event might be, we lose track of the more important question: What lessons can sport and entertainment executives learn from these studies? The first author of this article has been involved with over 50 sport industry economic impact studies, including analyses of the NBA All-Star game, the Dallas Cowboys’ new stadium, the NCAA Men’s Final Four basketball tournament, Singapore Grand Prix Formula 1 race, and the India Premier League, to name a few.

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Keeping up Attendance: Building a Community Around Our Brand, pp. 20-26
Authors: Bob Heere
Abstract: In an age where we have unlimited access to entertainment through television, computers, handheld devices (e.g., tablets, digital audio players), and mobile phones, many entertainment venues are struggling to keep up attendance and to differentiate themselves from the living room and mobile entertainment experience. Yet, no matter how many people are invited to your viewing party, it does not approximate the thousands sitting in the venue itself, which provides a sensory experience that is unmatched at home, let alone on your mobile device. If we think about this for a moment, we could make an argument that it is not the actual core product (the music performance, the football game, the musical) that separates the living room from the venue; on the contrary, often the core product is better viewed, or listened to, from the couch, but it is the interaction with the other live attendees that makes the event special. We do not necessarily attend hallmark events like the Ashes cricket rivalry, a Rolling Stones concert in Hyde Park, London, or a football match at the World Cup because we care about the sport or teams involved. What motivates us to attend in many instances are the other fans and the atmosphere they create through their interaction (e.g., singing, chanting, shouting, etc.).

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PRACTICE IN THE FIELD: BEYOND THE PUBLICATION. Research and Advocacy in Disability Sport and Sport and Human Rights: The Journey Along the Road to Scholar-Advocacy, pp. 27-32
Authors: Mary A. Hums and Eli A. Wolff
Abstract: One of the true joys of working in a sport or entertainment management program is the interdisciplinary nature of our fields. As professors, we have a choice to pursue interests in related fields such as sociology, psychology, marketing, management, history, political science, or anthropology. We may also define ourselves as theoretical researchers, practitioner-oriented consultants, administrators, and/ or teachers. Working in academia, we will likely take on a number of these roles at different points or our professional lives. While we value these roles, the authors of this article decided early in our careers that among these roles, above all, we wanted to define ourselves as scholar advocates. Scholar advocates are those individuals who primarily want to apply their training and expertise to advocacy for the rights of those individuals and/or groups that might lack the power to achieve the objectives that other individuals and/or groups take for granted.

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