IJSF Issue 7:2

Contents for IJSF Issue 7:2

Entire issue of IJSF 7:2
Authors: David Forrest, J. Christian Müller, Joachim Lammert, Gregor Hovemann, Kevin G. Quinn, David J. Berri, Daniel A. Rascher, Timothy D. DeSchriver
Abstract:This is the entire issue in PDF format that you can download

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The Threat to Football from Betting-Related Corruption, pp. 99-116
Authors: David Forrest
Abstract:Manipulation of on-field events for betting gain appears to be a growing problem in football and other sports. It can be linked to developments in the betting environment and is a potential threat to the football industry to the extent that it may deter fans, sponsors, and broadcasters from purchasing the product. Risks are highest in European lower-tier competitions where high liquidity in the betting market contrasts with modest incomes among players and officials. The liquidity is provided principally by Asian betting markets that are largely unregulated, which itself is a significant obstacle to protecting the sport from corruption.

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The Financial Fair Play Regulations of UEFA: An Adequate Concept to Ensure the Long-Term Viability and Sustainability of European Club Football?, pp. 117-140
Authors: J. Christian Müller, Joachim Lammert, and Gregor Hovemann
Abstract:In response to the severe financial plight of many clubs that regularly take part in European competitions, UEFA developed the concept of Financial Fair Play as an extension of its licensing regulations. The aim of the concept is to curtail financial foul play in European football (nonpayment of liabilities owing to rival clubs or employees) and financial doping (excessive funding provided to cover losses arising from expenses for playing talent not balanced by revenues). The paper addresses the question if the Financial Fair Play is an adequate concept to ensure the long-term viability and sustainability of European club football as intended by UEFA. To answer this question, we illustrate the empirical background and search for a theoretical justification within the field of sport economics. Based on structuring UEFA’s objectives, we analyze and evaluate the major amendments of the Financial Fair Play Regulations.

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Getting to the 2011-2020 National Football League Collective Bargaining Agreement, pp. 141-157
Authors: Kevin G. Quinn
Abstract:This paper examines the economic issues leading up to the 2011 NFL lockout and the resultant Collective Bargaining Agreement with the NFLPA. The history of labor relations between the league and the union is presented. The league’s antitrust situation that led up to the 1993 CBA is discussed in detail, along with the economic consequences of that agreement and its successors through 2006. The issues dividing the players and the league in the wake of the 2006 CBA are discussed. The key events during the 2011 lockout and the details of the 2011-2020 CBA are provided.

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Did the Players Give Up Money to Make the NBA Better? Exploring the 2011 Collective Bargaining Agreement in the National Basketball Association, pp. 158-175
Authors: David J. Berri
Abstract:The NBA and its players union reached a new collective bargaining agreement in 2011. As a result of this agreement, the players will now be receiving less money. The NBA argued that a pay cut for the players was necessary to make the league better. More specifically, the NBA argued that if the players accepted less money, more teams could afford to field competitive teams. Therefore, competitive balance would improve, demand for the sport would increase, and ultimately the players would be better off. Although the NBA did get the players to accept less money, the empirical evidence—from published research—casts significant doubt on the story the NBA told its players.

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Smooth Operators: Recent Collective Bargaining in Major League Baseball, pp. 176-208
Authors: Daniel A. Rascher and Timothy D. DeSchriver
Abstract:In late 2011, at a time when other leagues such as the National Football League and the National Basketball Association had engaged in work stoppages, Major League Baseball owners and the MLB Players Association harmoniously agreed on a new five-year collective bargaining agreement. This article focuses on the reasons why MLB as an industry has maintained labor peace after decades of work stoppages. The primary aspects of the new MLB CBA, such as changes to the revenue sharing system, competitive balance tax, salary arbitration, and the amateur draft are addressed. The manner in which these economic mechanisms affect areas such as competitive balance will be analyzed. Lastly, a comparison was undertaken of the collective bargaining environment in MLB versus other professional sports leagues and other non-sports industries.

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