IJSF Issue 13:1

Contents for IJSF Issue 13:1

IJFS 13:1
Authors: Vincent Hogan and Patrick Massey, Aju J Fenn and David Berri, Petr Parshakov and Marina Zavertiaeva,
Henk Erik Meier, Mara Konjer, Stephan Stroth, Carlos Varela-Quintana, Julio del Corral, Juan Prieto-Rodriguez
Abstract:International Journal of Sport Finance, Volume 13, No. 1, February 2018.

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Competitive Balance: Results of a Natural Experiment from Rugby Union
Authors: Vincent Hogan and Patrick Massey
Abstract:We present evidence on the impact of revenue sharing and salary caps on both short- and long-run competitive balance based on a form of unique natural experiment—the abolition of Rugby Union’s ban on professionalism and the different responses of the English (EPR) and French (T14) leagues to its removal. The EPR has operated revenue sharing and a binding salary cap for most of the professional era, but the T14 only introduced a non-binding salary cap much more recently. We use a dataset of net winning margins from 9,438 matches in both leagues over 27 seasons from 1987/88 to 2015/16 to measure short-run competitive balance. Our results indicate that short run competitive balance in both leagues declined following the move to professionalism, but subsequently improved in the EPR following the introduction of revenue-sharing and a binding salary cap. Play offs also improved short-run balance, as did reductions in the number of teams. We also find some evidence that long-run balance improved in the EPR at least initially following the move to professionalism and absent a binding salary cap professionalism reduced long-run balance in the T14.

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Drafting a Successful Wide Receiver in the NFL—Hail Mary?
Authors: Aju J Fenn and David Berri
Abstract:This paper examines the efficacy of the NFL draft in selecting successful wide receivers that go on to be successful in the league. We identify variables that are significant determinants of draft day selection and investigate if those same variables explain productivity in the NFL.

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Determinants of Performance in eSports: A Country-Level Analysis
Authors: Petr Parshakov and Marina Zavertiaeva
Abstract:This study provides readers with new information about key drivers of performance in the emerging area of eSports. Competitive computer gaming (eSports) is becoming increasingly popular, and the number of gamers and amount of prize money is growing. We therefore explore some key country-level characteristics that may contribute to players’ success, measured as money won. We use gamers’ prize earnings aggregated by country and a hurdle model to understand the determinants of performance. The results show that a 1% increase in GDP per capita leads to a 2.2% increase in prize money per capita. Country population is not statistically significant in the outcome model. This finding may indicate that eSports talents are not uniformly distributed across the world population. Surprisingly, post-Soviet and planned or post-planned economies are more likely to participate in eSports.

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Provincial Consumer Preferences and Fragmented Sport Governance: Demand for Professional Boxing in Germany
Authors: Henk Erik Meier, Mara Konjer, Stephan Stroth
Abstract:Research presented here aims to contribute to the literature on demand for individual sports and its implications for industry structure. It is argued that “provincial” preferences, that is, a dominant interest in national identification or local stars, might account for the persistence of fragmented governance of boxing. The analyses of a unique dataset on professional free-to-air boxing telecasts in Germany defy the idea that preferences for national idols and local stars are dominant motives for German sports audiences. Local stardom certainly plays an important role, but a strong impact of scheduling was detected. Moreover, consumers seem to rely on simple heuristics for judging the quality of a fight. The results suggest that boxing’s fragmented governance structure served to cater to the provincial tastes of German consumers. Accordingly, in order to mitigate potential governance fragmentation, emerging combat sports have to find ways to satisfy the demand for local idols and meaningful titles in their competition structure.

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Order Effect Under the “Away-Goals Rule:” Evidence from CONMEBOL Competitions
Authors: Carlos Varela-Quintana, Julio del Corral, Juan Prieto-Rodriguez
Abstract:This paper tests for the existence of an order effect in competitive situations using the natural experiment of the introduction of the “away-goals rule” in CONMEBOL club competitions. This rule states that in a case of a two-legged fixture finishing level on goals, the team that scores more goals as a visitor will qualify for the next round. Fixed-effects logit analyses for the period 1988-2014 provide evidence that, after the application of the rule in 2005, teams that played the second leg as visitors had an increased probability of winning in regulation time. This phenomenon was especially significant when the “visitor in the second leg” was the stronger team of an evenly matched game, or conceded no goals in the first match. Several explanations related to behavioral biases, such as psychological pressure, time inconsistency, and loss aversion, are proposed.

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