IJSF Issue 10:4

Contents for IJSF Issue 10:4

IJFS 10:4
Authors: Jill Harris, David J. Berri, Nicholas M. Watanabe, Pamela Wicker, James C. Reuter, Richard C. K. Burdekin, Matthew Grindon Morton, Patrick Rishe, Jason Reese, Brett Boyle, Brian P. Soebbing, Patrick Tutka, and Chad S. Seifried
Abstract:International Journal of Sport Finance, Volume 10, No. 4, November 2015.

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Predicting the WNBA Draft: What Matters Most from College Performance?, pp. 299-309
Authors: Jill Harris and David J. Berri
Abstract:The reverse-order draft has been the subject of a number of studies in the economics literature. These studies generally examine the quality of decisions teams make in this process. The results in the studies of the NFL, NBA, and MLB all highlight problems with the player evaluation process. This study contributes to this literature and the broader literature on gender economics via an examination of the WNBA. Similar to other studies, we also find issues with decision-making in the WNBA draft.

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Determinants of Stoppage Time Awarded to Teams in the English Premier League, pp. 310-327
Authors: Nicholas M. Watanabe, Pamela Wicker, and James C. Reuter
Abstract:Previous research examining referee bias in football (soccer) has not distinguished between incidents (goals, substitutions, fouls, cards) in regulation and in stoppage time. This study examines the determinants of stoppage time seconds in matches of the English Premier League using data from the second half of all close matches of the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 seasons with a two-goal (n=634) and one-goal differential (n=478). The regression results show that the number of goals scored, substitutions, and yellow cards in the regulation 45 minutes of the second half and in stoppage time have a significant positive effect on stoppage time. Yet, only fouls in stoppage time have a significant positive effect, but not fouls in regulation. Referees awarded more added time for incidents in stoppage time than in regulation. Also, the number of seconds lost for injuries during the second half was not fully mirrored.

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Blood Money: Violence for Hire in the National Hockey League, pp. 328-356
Authors: Richard C. K. Burdekin and Matthew Grindon Morton
Abstract:Fans have long been attracted to the violence of professional hockey and the positive relationship between attendance and violent incidents has led to it being characterized as a “blood sport.” This paper assesses how NHL salaries reward not only skilled players but also “enforcers” whose value is driven more by fighting ability. We find evidence that the factors determining the salaries of these two player types differ significantly. Enforcers are seen to be valued more for their defensive contributions, and only for the enforcer group is there any evidence that penalty minutes have a positive effect on earnings.

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Secondary Market Behavior During College Football’s Postseason: Evidence from the 2014 Rose Bowl and BCS Championship Game, pp. 357-374
Authors: Patrick Rishe, Jason Reese, and Brett Boyle
Abstract:Though there is reason to believe that college football bowl game administrators engage in inelastic ticket pricing, there is no academic literature that specifically examines this point. This seminal investigation of secondary prices in college football, which focuses on two bowl games that took place at the same stadium within a six-day span during the first week of 2014, sheds insight onto inelastic ticket pricing for college bowl games, secondary pricing comparisons across different online ticket resellers, the influence “pent-up” demand and distance traveled can have on secondary markups, and revealed consumer preferences towards seat quality and optimal “sightlines.” Though dynamically pricing bowl games could yield larger gate revenues, various logistical reasons are discussed as to why this practice is uncommon for such games.

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The Effect of Sanctions on External Job Promotions of NCAA Division I-FBS College Football Head Coaches, pp. 375-388
Authors: Brian P. Soebbing, Patrick Tutka, and Chad S. Seifried
Abstract:The purpose of the present research is to explore the role sanctions play in external job promotions of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I-FBS head college football coaches. Specifically, we examined head football coach movement from the 1973-1974 season through the 2012-2013 season, which produced 3,913 coach-season observations. Within college athletics, sanctions come from the actions that are recognized and penalized by the NCAA. Overall, we found 144 incident files related to sanctions. Estimating a logistic regression model, we found sanctions do not impact the likelihood of external job promotion. However, other factors such as on-field performance, university characteristics, and the availability of other coaching positions do influence external job promotion of current head coaches.

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