SMQ Issue 23:2

Contents for SMQ Issue 23:2

SMQ 23.2
Authors: Jim Kadlecek, Steve McKelvey, Khalid Ballouli, Gregg Bennett, Yong Jae Ko, Yong Chae Rhee, Yu Kyoum Kim, Taeho Kim, Mark P. Pritchard, Rick Burton, Youngbum Kwon, Dae Hee Kwak, Matthew T. Brown and Todd Koesters
Abstract: Sport Marketing Quarterly, Volume 23, No. 2, June 2014. This is the entire issue in PDF format that you can download.

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A Note from the SMA Executive Director, p. 55
Authors: Jim Kadlecek
Abstract: Earlier this year the Sport Marketing Association (SMA) National Office relocated from St. Leo University to the University of Mount Union. Executive Director Eric Schwarz, who worked tirelessly in his service to SMA, served the organization very well in this capacity. While he has stepped out of the Executive Director role, Eric will continue to be involved with SMA. Many thanks to Eric and his staff at St. Leo University for their hard work and commitment to running the business operations of SMA.

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Industry Insider: Ray Katz, pp. 56-58
Authors: Steve McKelvey
Abstract: An interview with Ray Katz, executive vice president of sports marketing for Source Communications.

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New (Sound)Waves in Sport Marketing: Do Semantic Differences in Analogous Music Impact Shopping Behaviors of Sport Consumers?, pp. 59-72
Authors: Khalid Ballouli and Gregg Bennett
Abstract: This research examines the effects of brand music on consumer behavior in a stadium retail store. Brand music is custom-fit music embodying the unique attributes and characteristics of a brand, using distinctive lyrics in otherwise analogous music to prime specific concepts. Extant research on store atmospherics and theoretical perspectives of conceptual fluency guided this investigation and aided in hypothesis development. A total of 232 shoppers were randomly intercepted during two shopping scenarios in which brand music or generic (popular) music was played in a stadium retail store. Structural equation modeling was utilized to examine a series of testable hypotheses. Brand music was found to affect participants’ perceptions of musical fit, which led to favorable effects on evaluations of the store environment, satisfaction with the shopping experience, and attitudes toward the brand. Results not only have implications for sport retailing, but also for sensory marketing and sport consumer behavior.

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Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility and Donor Behavior in College Athletics: The Mediating Effects of Trust and Commitment, pp. 73-85
Authors: Yong Jae Ko, Yong Chae Rhee, Yu Kyoum Kim, and Taeho Kim
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to advance our understanding of the role of perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the donor decision making process in college athletics. A research model was developed to examine theoretical relationships among perceived CSR, trust, commitment and donation intention. The proposed research model was tested using 644 donors from a college booster club in the US through simultaneous equations. It was concluded from the results that donors’ perceptions about CSR activities significantly influenced trust and commitment toward the organization. Trust and commitment played a mediating role in explaining the relationship between CSR perception and donor behavior. This study not only makes a theoretical contribution to CSR literature by providing an expanded view of CSR and its impact on donor behavior, but also offers meaningful implications to managers.

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Ethical Failures in Sport Business: Directions for Research, pp. 86-99
Authors: Mark P. Pritchard and Rick Burton
Abstract: Ethical miscues in the 21st century sport industry are more prominent and deliver greater impact than ever before. News outlets now offer programming and content sites specifically dedicated to tracking ethical failures that occur “Outside the Lines.” Unfortunately, this unparalleled media exposure aggressively paints sport heroes and the organizations they represent in shades of bad, ugly and reprehensible, replete with distressing coverage of questionable deeds and shameful failures. Negative fallout in sports often becomes the marketer’s responsibility when they are called upon to resolve the damage created for their brand. But is there a remedy here? This article takes up this challenge and discusses the nature of ethics in sport business. A literature review is used to refine 15 directions for research that address three related areas. Essentially, these questions (1) the nature of ethical misconduct in sport business and why it can become an important public issue, (2) what it means for a sports marketer to be ethical (i.e., do good), and finally (3) how social expectation and personal conscience play a role in determining responses to ethical dilemmas that practitioners face.

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Revisiting the Team Identification-Value-Purchase Relationship in the Team-Licensed Merchandise Consumption Context: A Multidimensional Consumer Value Approach, pp. 100-114
Authors: Youngbum Kwon and Dae Hee Kwak
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the role of multidimensional consumer values in the relationship between team identification, purchase attitude, and purchase intention in the team-licensed merchandise context. The study also tested the moderating effects of product category (utilitarian/hedonic) and performance priming (positive/negative). Fans of two college sport teams (N = 203) participated in the study. Both multidimensional consumer values (i.e., functional, emotional, and social) and team identification were shown to influence purchase attitude. In turn, the attitude toward team-licensed merchandise had a direct significant impact on purchase intention. Product category moderated the relationship between team identification and consumer values as well as the relationship between team identification and purchase attitude. More specifically, the relationship between team identification and perceived consumer values was significantly strong for hedonic products, while the impact of team identification on attitudes toward sportlicensed merchandise was significantly pronounced for utilitarian products.

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Beware of Flying Hotdogs: Inherent or Unreasonable Risks?, pp. 115-117
Authors: Matthew T. Brown and Todd Koesters
Abstract: In-game promotions are a marketing mainstay designed to entertain spectators at sporting events as part of the total entertainment environment (Veeck, 1996). Spectator sporting events are designed as experiences that should never let spectators become bored (Brown & Kreutzer, 2002). As a result, there has been an increase over time in the number and variety of promotional activities held during sporting events. From “Kiss Cams” to mascot and dizzy bat races, the number and variety of promotional activities held during a game seems never ending (Crenshaw, 2014).

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